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Single Double Combination Stitch Crochet Tutorial

This is a crochet stitch combination that I didn't even know had a name until, well, I looked it up so I could name this tutorial!


Single Double Combination Stitch

Double Single Combination Stitch

The Lemon Peel Stitch

Seed Stitch

Up and Down Stitch


There are a lot of different names!


But regardless of what you call it, the stitch itself is a simple one and great to add to your crochet toolkit.


In a nutshell, it's simply alternating single crochet and double crochet stitches and then stacking them up alternately with each new row.


And all that means is that when you begin a new row, you want to make sure that you work a single crochet on top of a double crochet stitch and a double crochet stitch on top of a single crochet stitch.


Let's take a look at how this works.


How to Crochet the Single Double Combination Stitch


For a flat project worked in back and forth rows, you'll usually begin with an even number of stitches. (More on this in a minute.)


If you'd like to use this stitch for a project in the round, you must have an even number of stitches.


For this example, I'm working flat and begin with a chain of nine for a total of eight stitches across after skipping the first chain to work my first single crochet stitch into the 2nd chain from the hook. This will give me four single crochets and four double crochets in each row.


Let's have a look at the video tutorial:



One of the great things about this stitch is that you can work it over either an odd OR an even number of stitches. Which you will have noticed if you watched the whole video, of course!


So let's dive into the written instructions for BOTH versions of this stitch.


Single Double Combination Stitch Written Instructions:


Option 1 (even number of stitches):


Row 1: Beginning with an odd number of chain stitches, skip the first chain stitch and single crochet into the 2nd chain from your hook.


*Double crochet into the next chain stitch, single crochet into the next chain stitch.


Repeat from * all the way across to the last chain stitch.


Double crochet in the last chain stitch.


Here's what one row worked into a starting chain of nine looks like:


Close up image of a single row of crochet using an aqua blue yarn showcasing alternating single crochet and double crochet stitches.

Do you notice how the double crochet stitches kind of squish down in between the single crochets? (Except for the last one.) That's what causes our very subtle texture!


Also, it should remind you of our Tiny Treble Popcorns from last time, right!? It's just less pronounced, of course.


Row 2: chain 1 and turn.


Single crochet in the first stitch. (This should be a double crochet stitch—which is the last stitch you worked at the end of the previous row.)


*Double crochet into the next stitch, single crochet into the next stitch, ensuring that each double crochet is worked into the top of a single crochet stitch and each single crochet stitch is worked into the top of a double crochet stitch.


Repeat from * all the way across to the last stitch.


Double crochet in the last stitch. (Which should be a single crochet.)


Here's a look at the first two rows:


Close up view of a small crochet swatch using aqua yarn that shows two rows of the single double combination stitch.

Now you can see the backs of those double crochets puffing out on the Wrong Side of Row 1!


Row 3: repeat Row 2.


And there you have it!


If you are beginning with an existing fabric, or if you begin with a row of single crochet stitches for a straighter edge, then you will simply begin with and continue to repeat Row 2 for this pattern.


Here's what a few rows look like (in purple!):


A small crochet swatch in purple yarn sitting on a dove gray painted board that showcases the single double combination crochet stitch.

(I need to buy myself some more aqua yarn; my remaining ball of it that's just for tutorials is getting rather small!)


Option 2 (odd number of stitches):


Row 1: Beginning with an even number of chain stitches, skip the first chain stitch and single crochet into the 2nd chain from your hook.


*Double crochet into the next chain stitch, single crochet into the next chain stitch.


Repeat from * all the way across. (You'll end with a single crochet, the same stitch you began with.)


This will give you a different number of stitches between the two; you should have an odd number of single crochets and an even number of double crochets.


Row 2: chain 3 and turn (counts as first double crochet here and throughout) OR turn and work your favorite chainless double crochet in the first stich (I demo my favorite chainless dc in the video above or you can find a standalone tutorial for it here).


Single crochet in the second stitch (which should be a double crochet).


*Double crochet into the next stitch, single crochet into the next stitch, ensuring that each double crochet is worked into the top of a single crochet stitch and each single crochet stitch is worked into the top of a double crochet stitch.


Repeat from * all the way across to the last stitch.


Double crochet in the last stitch. (Which should be a single crochet.)


Notice that the same as on Row 1, you end with the same stitch (double crochet) that you began with.


And this time you have the opposite arrangement of stitches with an odd number of double crochets and an even number of single crochets.


Row 3: chain 1 and turn. Single crochet into the first stitch (which should be a double crochet).


*Double crochet into the next stitch, single crochet into the next stitch.


Repeat from * all the way across.


Again, same as with Row 1, you should both begin and end with a single crochet stitch and you should have an odd number of single crochet stitches and an even number of double crochets.


Additional Rows: Repeat Rows 2-3 as many times as you'd like!


Tip: if you'd like that straight edge I showed you in the video, begin with an even number of chain stitches and then single crochet into the 2nd chain from your hook and into each chain across. This will give you an odd number of stitches and you can skip ahead to Row 3 and then continue with Row 2-3 repeats.


When you're ready to finish off, you'll simply end with a row of single crochet stitches worked into each stitch across instead of the next Row 2 repeat.


Here's what that might look like, again, in purple!


A small crochet swatch featuring the single double crochet combination stitch in purple yarn that's sitting on a dove gray painted board.

And just for giggles, here are the two options side by side:


Two small rectangular swatches in purple yarn that illustrate two different ways of working the single double crochet combination stitch, one with an even number of stitches, the other with an odd number of stitches.

The one on the left is Option 1 worked with an even number of stitches and the one on the right is Option 2 worked with an odd number of stitches.


Do you have any preference between the two of them? Let me know in the comments!


But before I let you go, let's take a look at a couple projects so you can see these stitches in action, so to speak.


To date I only feature this stitch sequence in two patterns, but they're very different designs!


Simple Textures Scarf


The first time I used it was for the Simple Textures scarf design that is the main project for what was my very first pre-recorded online class. You can still find it over on Skillshare!


Crochet Basics: From Skein to Scarf online class cover image that shows a gray crocheted scarf on a metal dress form sitting on top of a brown wooden table in front of a window with white blinds pulled and orange curtains.

(Use my referral link to get your first month free if you're not already a member.)


The pattern itself is also available right here on my blog for free as well as for a small fee on Ravelry if you'd prefer to have a more printer friendly pdf version. You also get a copy of the pdf in the online course, of course!


Now. Please keep in mind that this is one of my older patterns and it could probably do with a bit of a facelift! I've refined my pattern writing process quite a bit since then, but I stand by it still and, of course, if you have any questions at all while you're working on it or any other patterns I've designed, you're always welcome to reach out to me or post in my free Facebook group for support.


You'll notice, though, that I actually show you a third option in the Simple Textures scarf pattern that uses a turning chain of two instead of a chainless double crochet, so be sure to check it out if you'd like to see how it looks compared to the two options I showed you today.


A gray crocheted scarf displayed on a black wire dress form in front of a white wall sitting on a small black table atop a blue doily next to a skein of gray yarn and the crochet hook used to make it.

The 100 Day Project Shawl


The other pattern this stitch combo features in is actually my newest pattern!


I use the single double crochet combination stitch in Part 3 of the 100 Day Project Shawl, which is a design in progress that I'm sharing publicly AS I design it as part of my 100 Day Project this year.


(The other part of it is painting, of course, and I'm sharing my progress over on Patreon this year. Check it ALL out here.)


And yes, you read that correctly! Sharing it publicly means I'm not just sharing progress photos on socials and Patron-only posts on Patreon—each update on the shawl is available WITH the written instructions for FREE!


So it's kind of like a mystery CAL for anyone who would like to crochet a shawl along with me! Well, except you already have access to the first three clues, ha ha!


I'm using ten mini skeins and one full skein of a fingering weight tweed yarn from Six and Seven Fiber—check out the materials list here.


In fact, here's a list of each Part that's available so far!



Part 4 will be coming soon!


Here's a look at those Part 3 single double combo stitches, though (in red):


A close up image of a multi-colored crocheted fabric in a red and brown variegated yarn alongside a narrow stripe of creamy tweed followed by a different stitch pattern in a variegated orange tweed yarn.

Mmm, always love me some yummy texture!


So what do you think about this simple stitch sequence? Have you tried it before?


If not, I invite you to join me in making your own version of the 100 Day Project Shawl, which is an adventure through both color and texture as we try a new stitch with each new mini skein!


Or you can also totally improv your own project now, right?


I can't wait to see what you make!!

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